“Our Daily Bread” & Thanksgiving Day

As we celebrate Thanksgiving Day, let us make God the center of our celebration. Remember that “[e]very good gift and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father” through His Son Jesus Christ (James 1:17). Commenting on Psalm 118:1, Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892) says, “We must not stop at the agent, but rise to the first cause and render all our praises unto the LORD himself.” Spurgeon’s words remind me of the children’s story called “Our Daily Bread”:

 

OUR DAILY BREAD

A little boy’s mother gave him
a brown roll for his breakfast.
The little boy said, “Thank you, mother.
Thank you for my nice brown roll.”
The mother said,
“Don’t thank me, thank the miller.”

The little boy ran to the miller.
He said, “Thank you, miller.
Thank you for my nice brown roll.”
The miller said,
“Don’t thank me, thank the farmer.”

The little boy ran to the farmer.
He said, “Thank you, farmer.
Thank you for my nice brown roll.”
The farmer said,
“Don’t thank me, thank the rain.
I only planted the wheat.”
The little boy saw the clouds in the sky.

He saw the raindrops falling.
He said, “Thank you, rain.
Thank you for my nice brown roll.”
The rain said,
“Don’t thank me, thank the sun.
I only helped a little.”

Just then the sun began to shine.
The little boy said, “Thank you, sun.
Thank you for my nice brown roll.”
The sun said, “Don’t thank me.
Thank God who made me.”

The little boy went back to the table.
He folded his hands.
Then he said, “Thank you, God.
Thank you for my nice brown roll.”

 

“Oh give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever!” (Psalm 118:1)

Charles Spurgeon Thanksgiving Day

Charles Haddon Spurgeon’s Appropriations of Bernard of Clairvaux

One of the great marks of the preaching and writing ministry of Charles Haddon Spurgeon was his vast knowledge of other preachers and writers.  Throughout his sermons, articles, and books he often cites great men and women that came before him.  He surely took to heart the words of John of Salisbury, “We are like dwarves sitting upon the shoulders of giants.  We see more, and things that are more distant than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature adds to ours.”[1]  Spurgeon was surely in his time a “shoulder stander” but he was no dwarf; and today, as he stood so tall on the shoulders of others, many are taking their post atop his broad shoulders.  Lewis Drummond said of him, “Spurgeon vividly recognized that Christians who truly want to walk with God must look back to the past and all that God has done in the lives of those who have preceded them.  Therefore he immersed himself in their writings.”[2]  From the Patristic writers, Spurgeon refers to Justin Martyr, Tertullian, Origen, Gregory of Nazianzus, Basil of Caesarea, Jerome, and most obviously Augustine.[3]

 

The article is by Jason Edwin Dees, pastor of First Baptist Church, Covington, Georgia. While pastoring, he is pursuing his Ph.D. degree in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

Click here to read his entire paper.


[1] John, and Daniel D. McGarry. The Metalogicon of John of Salisbury: a twelfth-century defense of the verbal and logical arts of the trivium. Berkeley: University of California Press. 1955. (3.4). (John of Salisbury quoting Bernard of Chartres in his work The Metalogicon)

[2] Lewis A. Drummond. Spurgeon: prince of preachers. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1992. 572.

[3] Lewis A. Drummond. Spurgeon: prince of preachers. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1992. 572.

Bernard of Clairvaux Charles Spurgeon Preaching

The Piety of A Prince: A Consideration of the Piety of Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Preface

As I have gotten to know Charles Spurgeon over the past several months I have truly come to enjoy and love the man.  The more I learned about his piety, the way he conducted his life and the way he knew Christ, the more I liked and admired him.  He, even nearly one hundred and twenty years after his death, has taken on another student.  I am eager to learn more about this man’s life and ministry and I am honored to write this paper.

 

The article is by Jason Edwin Dees, pastor of First Baptist Church, Covington, Georgia. While pastoring, he is pursuing his Ph.D. degree in Biblical Spirituality at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

Click here to read the entire article.

Charles Spurgeon Piety